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DharmaMind Buddhist Group

 

DharmaMind Weekly Meetings

Our weekly group meetings are held each Monday in the downstairs yoga studio. There is a period of meditation and a short puja followed by a dharma talk or the playing of a DVD or CD and dharma discussion. The suggest donation is €5. We gather at 7:15pm and newcomers are welcome, although it is suggested you have some experience with Buddhist Meditation/Practice. For beginners, we run a 'Introduction to Buddhist Meditation and Daily Practice' course over 3 weeks, starting at 8:15pm on the first Monday of each month. For information on this please visit our MeetUp page.

For further details contact: Karl on 086 102 9685

 

About the DharmaMind Buddhist Group:

We are a western Mahayana Buddhist group which could be described as having a close resemblance to the Chan/Zen style of practice. Our teacher, Āloka David Smith, was a lay practitioner with over 40 years of dharma training, including a period as a monk in Sri Lanka. Our students come from all over the UK and Ireland, and meet weekly in local groups. We also hold retreats throughout the year in various centres, our main central meeting being held monthly in Kings Heath, Birmingham. The Dublin group meets each Monday evening in Oscailt.

Although we are a western Buddhist group, our training form and meditation follow the traditional structure of far eastern Buddhism. However, what we don’t carry are the cultural trappings that have become a part of these traditions over the centuries. The practice of the group is concerned with learning to discover the Dharma Mind through the ancient immanent training model known as ‘Silent Illumination’, which originated in ancient China. Our practice is a path that embraces all of life without discrimination, in a spirit of inclusiveness. It is not a one-sided path of lists and formulas, but instead a path of learning to open up in a whole and complete way to ourselves throughout all of life’s situations. Over time, we begin to discover emotional and mental freedom and an ever-developing spaciousness, stillness and insight.

This practice, which essentially takes place in our physical body, results in the gradual healing and reintegration of our mind and body. When we are truly integrated we become whole and fulfilled, and the samsaric world of becoming and suffering, which we ourselves have created, falls away. In that falling away our true-nature, our Buddha-nature, will reveal itself. In this moment we become free to rediscover and taste the wonder and astonishment of reality and our divine nature.